Green Design with Breathtaking Views

Leicester House Marvin Windows - exterior

This is the last installment in our series called Energy-Efficient Windows 101 made possible by Marvin Windows and Doors.  Last time I discussed how Marvin windows contribute towards LEED certification, and today want to wrap it up with this showcase of an award-winning home in Leicester, North Carolina.  Designed by Eric Gartner of New York-based SPG Architects, the energy-efficient home has a custom configuration of Marvin windows providing expansive southern and western views.

Leicester House Marvin Windows - interior

It’s hard to explain how digging the water well in 2008 influenced what ultimately was built, but that’s what happened, according to Gartner, SPG Architects.  Due to drought conditions, the well had to be dug much deeper than expected, and the housing economy basically crashed at about the same time.  When these two things happened, the owner reassessed plans and worked with Gartner on a more environmentally friendly home while still keeping a tight construction budget.

The result is a 3,000 square-foot abode with three bedrooms and three-and-a-half bathrooms, split between two levels.  The upper level has the living and master suite, while the lower level has the guest wing and can be zoned off when not in use to save energy.

A key feature of the Leicester home is an engineered window wall overlooking a green roof with sunset views of the west and also toward the south.  This was accomplished with the custom configuration of Marvin windows and doors explained below.

Leicester House Marvin Windows - windows

Contemporary and Green

Leicester collects about 80% of the water that falls on the house and diverts it to two tanks that hold a total of 3,400 gallons.  The non-potable resource is used for landscape irrigation and in the water-conserving toilets.  Also, the green roof reduces water runoff and the heat-island effect and insulates the guest wing below.

As for the construction, Leicester has a basic insulation package with R19 fiberglass in the walls, an insulated foam in the basement, and an R38+ roof with a combination of R19 fiberglass and closed-cell urethane foam.  The HVAC system has three zones – again, these can be shut down when an area of the house isn’t being used – powered by a geothermal system with a field of horizontal loops.

To conserve energy, the owner installed Energy Star appliances, Energy Star Marvin windows, and low-consumption lighting, and Gartner’s design includes massive overhangs for summer shade and winter warmth.  These windows facilitate stunning views and also provide for cross-ventilation.

Leicester House Cross Ventilation

About the Windows

The window package from Marvin works overtime to minimize unwanted heat gain from the west.  Gartner said the UV rating is really high, and, specifically, the windows have low-E2 glass filled with argon.

Marvin’s team was able to sync with the design team to deliver a mostly continuous view using steel bars engineered for structural support, connections, and an arrangement of the Ultimate Swinging French Door, Ultimate Casement Window, and Ultimate Awning Window.  And Gartner was honored as one of Marvin’s 2012 Architect’s Challenge winners.

If you’ve ever thought about having stunning views like this from your home, find a Marvin dealer near you to bring your vision to life.

Leicester House Marvin Windows - architecture

Courtesy: SPG Architects; credits: Daniel Levin Photography.

Go here to see the original: Green Design with Breathtaking Views

Compare Car Insurance|iPhone car insurance quotes|iPad car insurance quotes|Car Insurance quotes|Auto insurance|Find cheap car insurance|Compare Auto Insurance|Cheapest Car Insurance|Car insurance on iphone|Auto insurance app

Electronically Tintable Dynamic SageGlass Unveiled at BAU by Saint-Gobain

Sage Glass transition stage 1

SAGE Electrochromics, which was recently acquired to become a wholly owned subsidiary of Saint-Gobain of Paris, is demonstrating its newly developed advanced dynamic glass that it calls “SageGlass” at the 2013 BAU, the “World’s Leading Trade Fair for Architecture, Materials, Systems” in Munich.

SageGlass is electronically tintable to allow for modulation of light, glare, and solar heat gain. With the push of a button, or by of building automation systems or the proprietary SageClass control system, the glass can alter the solar heat gain and visible light transmission. Providing for efficient and flexible control of exterior light, SageGlass replaces blinds and motorized window shades that block light coming through windows, curtain walls, and skylights.

Sage Glass stage 2

Using a patented technology, the glazing level of SageGlass tint is dynamically controllable from 2% to 62% of light transmittance while maintaining transparency so that outdoor views are unobstructed to maximize energy efficiency while improving the comfort  and productivity of building occupants and increasing the value of the building.

Sage Glass Stage 3

According to a recent press release, SageGlass tint achieves this by managing “solar heat with a g value varying from 0.42 in its clearest state to 0.05 in the darkest state (values for a DGU with a Ug value of 1.1 W/m2.k).” The SageGlass dedicated automatic control system enables the tint to automatically adapt to outdoor luminance.

“BAU will be a terrific opportunity to showcase SageGlass’s impact on daylight and sun heat for the first time to the German market,” said SAGE SAINT-GOBAIN Europe, Director of Marketing and Sales, Kirk Ratzel.

Sage glass tint triple pane glass

Windows That Help with LEED Certification

This is the third installment in our series called Energy-Efficient Windows 101 made possible by Marvin Windows and Doors. In the previous article, I discussed some of the product options available for your energy-efficient windows. For this article I want to focus on how Marvin windows contribute towards a home’s efficiency and LEED certification.

Windows and Energy Efficiency

Windows are a weak point in the envelope of a home and can make a home uncomfortable or drafty. However, that doesn’t have to be the case with products available from Marvin. Energy-efficient windows and doors can help reduce energy bills by up to 15%, according to the Energy Star website, and Marvin has more than 150,000 options for meeting or exceeding Energy Star requirements. Marvin has dual- and triple-pane windows, various low-E coatings, insulating gases like argon and krypton, and several choices of framing materials.

Windows and LEED Certification

As you probably know, windows themselves can’t obtain LEED certification but they may contribute towards certification for a project or home. Marvin windows may help contribute toward LEED-H points in several categories relating to energy performance, construction waste management, recycled content, regional materials,daylighting and views, and certified wood.

Try the Smart Performance Promotion

Marvin is running a Smart Performance Promotion giving one lucky homeowner $5,000 toward the purchase of new Marvin windows and doors. In connection with the promotion, the company published a collection of energy efficiency and other home improvement tips from Lou Manfredini, a homebuilder, contributor to the Today Show, and host of HouseSmarts TV.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Windows with Energy Efficiency in Mind
  2. Energy Efficient Windows with Marvin
  3. How to Read a Home Window Label

Continued here: Windows That Help with LEED Certification

http://healthinsurancehunter.com

Windows with Energy Efficiency in Mind

This is another installment in our series called Energy-Efficient Windows 101 made possible by Marvin Windows and Doors. In our first article of the series, I discussed some window basics and how to read a home window label.  Now I want to discuss more product options available for your energy-efficient windows.  When you buy Marvin windows, you’ll have the opportunity to decide how many panes you need and which glazing and gas options can contribute towards your home performance goals and well as maximize your comfort.

Dual- or Triple-Pane Windows

Marvin has window products with two or three panes of glass.  Triple-pane, or tripane, windows are usually thicker, heavier, and have a lower U-factor and are attractive for northern climates. That said, dual-pane windows are the most common and perform well. Your local dealer can help you select the right coatings for your climate; for example, some coatings are more ideal for the north while others for southern climate zones.

Insulating Glass Glazing Options

Marvin can cover glass panes with a thin layer of metallic material to improve the energy performance of the window.  Specifically, low-emissivity, also LoE or Low-E, coatings on the glass surface and gaps between each pane can be used to block heat transfer through a window.  The following coatings are available, depending on window and door needs:

LoĒ-180® – a single metallic coating blocks heat loss to the outside and reflects heat back inside a home.  This coating is used when a high SGHC is needed, such as in northern climates.

LoĒ2-272® – a double metallic coating on the inside glass surface reflects heat into a room and rejects the warmth in the summer.  This coating is better at reducing heat loss than the LoĒ-180 and may be suitable in all climates except the Southern zone of Energy Star.

LoĒ3-366® – a triple metallic coating of silver which provides a lower U-factor and lower SHGC than the other two coatings.  This option is recommended in areas with intense sun and high cooling costs.

Insulating Gases Between Panes

In addition, Marvin can inject gases between panes to improve window performance.  Standard windows have argon to increase energy efficiency, while a blend of krypton, argon, and air is available in tripane products for enhanced performance in northern climates.

Wood/Aluminum Frame Options

Marvin offers wood interior or exterior, as well as durable extruded aluminum exterior option.

Additional Window Options

A couple of other options merit a quick mention as well. Marvin offers glass from Cardinal, whose designs prevent heat loss around the window perimeter. Marvin also offers an Energy Panel, which is a removable exterior glass panel with glazing that can be used to improve the performance of single-glazing wood windows.

Marvin has a fall energy efficiency program with the Smart Performance Promotion giving one lucky homeowner $5,000 toward the purchase of new Marvin windows and doors. In connection with the promotion, Marvin has a collection of energy efficiency and other home improvement tips from Lou Manfredini, a homebuilder, contributor to the Today Show, and host of HouseSmarts TV.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Energy Efficient Windows with Marvin
  2. How to Read a Home Window Label
  3. Alpen HPP Buys Serious Windows Assets

See the rest here: Windows with Energy Efficiency in Mind

http://truthabouthca.com/

October Month in Review [Outline]

Happy Halloween!  Here’s another outline of coverage from the prior month.  From newly published posts in October, I noticed that these four were the most popular — Firefly VAWT, Deltec Homestead, Floating Autarkhome, and How to Read a Window Label. Also, if you like reading Jetson Green but want something in book form on a given topic, here’s a list of books on the popular topics we cover.  The article outline:

Innovative Prefab & Other Projects:

Technology & Products Innovation:

Know-How & Other Green News:

Also, subscribe to our weekly newsletter for updates, article summaries, newsworthy links, and other site news.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Autarkhome: Sustainable Floating Passivhaus
  2. Sweet Pea is a Built Green Tiny Houseboat
  3. Survey: People Want More Green Homes

Excerpt from: October Month in Review [Outline]

new york car insurance companies

Energy Efficient Windows with Marvin

Over the years I’ve tried to fill in our coverage with more substantive, or how-to, information on topics relating to sustainable homes.  One topic that I’ve been itching to cover is energy-efficient windows, and I’m happy to announce that Minnesota-based Marvin Windows and Doors has agreed to share their expertise with Jetson Green for a series of articles loosely titled “Energy-Efficient Windows 101.”

Before jumping into this new series, I think it makes sense to introduce Marvin because I’m writing these articles based on information, research, photos, and videos that the company is sharing with us.

Marvin, as you may know, started in the lumber business in the early 1900s and gradually moved into making windows when trying to keep employees busy during the slower months of winter.  Now the company is a recognized leader in the window industry and retains its family roots with management made up of third and fourth generation members of the Marvin family.

The company makes windows to order with an extensive offering of clad colors, wood options, and hardware.  For more discerning customers, Marvin can make entirely custom window products and has more than 150,000 options for meeting or exceeding Energy Star requirements.  In short, this is a company that can focus on both design and energy efficiency.

If you have any window questions, leave a comment below.  The first article you’ll see relates to reading the rating label that’s placed on windows.

Photo courtesy: Marvin (picture of Leicester House in North Carolina with a custom configuration of Marvin Ultimate Awning Windows, Ultimate Casement Windows, and the Ultimate Swinging French Doors; copyright Daniel Levin Photography).

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Alpen HPP Buys Serious Windows Assets
  2. Zola Unveils New Passivehaus Windows
  3. Most Efficient Heat Pump by WaterFurnace

More here: Energy Efficient Windows with Marvin

empower network review

Alpen HPP Buys Serious Windows Assets

If you’re a designer, builder, or future owner of a high performance home, you’ll probably be interested in knowing that fiberglass window products previously sold under the SeriousWindows brand will now be sold under the Alpen brand.  Boulder-based Alpen High Performance Products announced the purchase of assets including the fiberglass window and architectural glass operation from California-based Serious Energy, Inc.

Originally, the same window and glass business was founded by Robert Clarke and sold under the Alpen brand from 1981 through 2008, when Serious Materials (a former sponsor of this site) bought the business, according to a statement by Alpen.

There will be a period of transition, but readers can now get the 525 Series, 725 Series, and 925 Series through Alpen.  In the future, expect more green building products, too.  Alpen CEO Brad Begin said: “As we grow our business to include other highly energy efficient products, we feel that Colorado offers a rich pool of talent for innovative green product development.

[+] More detail about Alpen’s purchase of SeriousWindows assets.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Zola Unveils New Passivehaus Windows
  2. Method Unveils Two Prefab Home Designs
  3. How to Find the Most Efficient Appliances

See more here: Alpen HPP Buys Serious Windows Assets

natural HGH

Energy Audit Savings, Current Drought, Living Thinking House, Liquid Cooled LEDs

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for updates, article summaries, newsworthy links, and other site news.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Liquid Cooling LEDs Available in 2012
  2. Home Depot Selling Cheap LEDs Online
  3. 60-Watt Equivalent LEDs for Below $40

Continue reading here: Energy Audit Savings, Current Drought, Living Thinking House, Liquid Cooled LEDs

The next wrinkle cream ingredient is a super antioxidant in which battles the particular signs regarding getting older through inside. Retinol A Wrinkle Cream does not simply exfoliate the surface layer of the skin like other over-the-counter wrinkle treatments. Check under eye wrinkle cream.

Zola Unveils New Passivehaus Windows

Zola European Windows recently sent us a press release with information about their new array of windows and doors made in a CAD/CAM facility in Europe.  The company is owned by Florian Speier, a Swiss architect and Certified Passive House Consultant, and headquartered in Colorado to serve U.S. and Canadian customers.  The aim is to provide products that are durable, energy-efficient, airtight, beautiful, and affordable.

Popular products include Tilt & Turn Windows and Lift-Slide Doors, although Zola also has other products such as casement windows, entry doors, folding glass walls, tilt-slide doors, and patio doors.

Zola offers windows in both wood (pine, meranti, or oak) and clad versions with wide variety of stains and paint finishes.  The windows have three levels of efficiency: Classic, Thermo, and Thermo+.

Classic is a double-glazed window with a U-value of about 0.18 BTU/hr/ft2; Thermo is a triple-glazed window with a U-value of about 0.09 BTU/hr/ft2 — ideal for net-zero and high-performance homes; and Thermo+ is a triple-glazed window with a U-value of 0.13 BTU/hr/ft2 and a SHGC of 0.50 for Passive House packages, according to Zola.

Zola ships everything direct from the factory in Europe, so customers should expect about 13 weeks lead time, depending on the end location.

In addition, delivery requires a flat-rate payment of $4,800, so small orders wouldn’t make much economic sense. But in terms of pricing, uPVC products are about $35 psf and Thermo+ clad products are about $65 psf, subject to unit size, etc.

[+] More about Zola European Windows for green homes.

Credits: Zola European Windows.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Light 12-Glazed Window on the Horizon
  2. Smart Windows that Save Big Energy
  3. NanaWall Unveils Bamboo Folding Doors

Read the original here: Zola Unveils New Passivehaus Windows

cheapest great quality car insurance

Light 12-Glazed Window on the Horizon

In the USA, most windows are probably single- or double-glazed and some builders will use triple-glazed windows for Passive House and other high-performance homes.  But in Hanover, Germany, a 12-glazed window prototype by Mariusz Paszkowski and Antoni Kostka was the star of the recent International Passive House Conference, according to Der Standard.  Check out these windows with aerogel!

The two scientists, in conjunction with SUPERWINDOWS, showcased INVIS160stack and INVIS160tweed, and both of the prototypes are about 160 mm thick, though they weigh no more than a double- or triple-glazed window unit.

INVIS160stack (above) is an insulated glass unit with two external glass panes that sandwich 10 layers of specially coated film without materially compromising visibility.  The inventive window makes it possible to achieve European U-values of 0.15 W/m2K, or the U.S. equivalent of R38 (R = 1/(.15/5.678)).

INVIS160tweed (below) is similar to INVIS160stack except that what’s sandwiched between two glass panes is several layers or sheets inclined at a 45-degree angle (as opposed to parallel to the external panes).  This approach makes it possible to achieve European U-values of 0.05 W/m2K, or the U.S. equivalent of R113 (R = 1/(.05/5.678)).

Of course, there’s a lot of work and investment to be done before these are suitable for commercial production, so there’s no pricing or availability yet.  But watch this space for window innovation.

[+] More about SUPERWINDOWS in development in Cracow, Poland.

Credits: SUPERWINDOWS.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Ingenious PV Glass Window Hits Chicago
  2. New Glazed Brick for Eco-Friendly Design
  3. Smart Windows that Save Big Energy

Excerpt from: Light 12-Glazed Window on the Horizon

Compare Car Insurance Plans