Prefab Fishers Island House Steps Up the Modern Modular to Luxury Vacation Living

Fisher Island Pre Fab House

Recently published by Resolution: 4 Architecture, this time lapse video shows how builders stacked thirteen prefabricated boxes to create this stunning six bedroom, five bathroom home in Fisher’s Island, New York.

For a total size of 4,469 square feet, the private vacation home resides on a wooded lot from which residents can gaze upon either side of Fishers Island, just off the coast of New London, Connecticut. Its UK-based inhabitants entertain family and friends here during holidays and summer months, sleeping dozens of guests.

The structure features a media room, a bunk room, two-car garage, guest suite, workshop.

Outdoor amenities include a screened porch, fireplace, shower, and  kitchen.

Environmentally friendly features include a solar photovoltaic system with solar hot water system, a green roof, grass pavers, and a 96% energy-efficient boiler.

Inside, you’ll find bamboo floors, maple cabinets, aluminum-clad wood windows with Low E insulated glass, Caesarstone countertops, and slate bathroom floors.

The exterior of the building is made of T&G cedar siding, Azek infill panels, IPE decking, and cement board panels.

Fisher Island Pre Fab House Night

With a design by Joseph Tanney and Robert Luntz of Resolution: 4 Architecture, the project architects for this home were Paul Coughlin and Brendan Miller, with manufacture by Simplex Industries and contracting by BD Remodeling & Restoration. Interior decoration and furniture was designed by David Bentheim.

Fisher Island Pre Fab House

 

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InterModal Design Ships Prefab Homes Worldwide

Shipping Container Modular Home External outdoors

Shipping Container Modular Home External outdoors

A subsidiary of Hive Modular, InterModal Design, manufactures durable, prefabricated homes from recycled shipping containers that can be shipped almost anywhere in the world. Shipping container shelters from InterModal Design (IMD) can be used for off-the grid living as primary residence, guest house, or office space. Dwellings can be built out with essential comforts such as kitchen space, a living room that can be transformed into a sleeping area, and bathroom facilities.

With a 3-in-1 structure, the IMD home maximizes the space of the container, creating a single structure with multiple functions. Chairs can be stored flat and a bed and table are installed in a drop-down fashion to be stowed away when not in use.

Shipping Container Modular Home double story

Shipping Container Modular Home double story

Several units are available, with pricing and details in spreadsheets on the IMD website, starting at US$35,000. Upgrades can be requested and custom projects are billed at $100 per hour. You cover costs of site preparation, delivery, and setup, with many areas requiring building permits for additional costs.

While you must assume responsibility for compliance with your local jurisdiction code ordinances for container usage, InterModal Design is available to assist with modifications to containers and designs to bring it to code.

Shipping Container Modular Home Design

Shipping Container Modular Home Design

Each standard plan includes basic furnishings, plumbing and electrical, but check the spec sheets for details on specific finishes to determine your need for upgrades. As your container home is being built, you can prepare your site, set the foundation, and hookup any necessary utilities. Delivery may require a crane and set crew. IMD will assist you in determining the best solutions for foundations and installation.

All products from IMD come with a 1-year warranty, honoring any state-required home warranties in the United States beyond that period of time.

Shipping Container Modular Home internal diagram

Shipping Container Modular Home internal diagram

Shipping Container 2 story home

Shipping Container 2 story home

Shipping Container Modular Home External outdoors

Shipping Container Modular Home External outdoors

New Orleans Architect Turns a Dumpster Into a Pool

Dumpster Dive DeLux The Pool Box

Stefan Beese, a New Orleans-based architect, has dove into an innovative form of recycled design with the “Dumpster Dive DeLux”, a pool made out of a defunct dumpster. You won’t be finding any cool old furniture when you jump in, but it will definitely feel much more luxurious.

The 22’ x 7’ steel refuse container is lined with protective foam insulation and pine wood slats on the exterior. The modular design makes it simple to pack it up and move it to a new location, so you don’t have to worry about leaving your dumpster pool behind if you move to a new neighborhood.

Dumpster Dive DeLux The Pool Box End

Dumpster Dive DeLux length

Prefab Norris House in Tennessee is a Living Lab for Energy and Water Use

New Norris House

Since 1933, the Tennessee Valley Authority community of Norris, Tennessee has showcased a variety of prefabricated houses with modern amenities such as electricity, heat, and indoor plumbing that were quite rare in Appalachia.

Today, the same community hosts the New Norris House, which showcases the principles of affordable sustainable living. The 1,006-square-foot prefab cottage is proudly exceeding LEED-Platinum standards by 30%, utilizing sunlight and rainwater to focus on self-reliance and conservation. The house uses 50% less energy than other homes in the area and requires no fossil fuels to run.

New Norris House

The demonstration home was created by a team of University of Tennessee-Knoxville College of Architecture + Design students and faculty members, who used passive solar design and ventilation to maintain comfortable temperatures during all seasons. Natural daylight was an important consideration for the design, and a retractable awning on the southern side controls the amount of heat distributed throughout the home in summer and winter. A solar hot water panel and tankless electric water heater work together to maintain water temperatures, and about 85% of roof runoff is used for toilet flushing, laundry, and irrigation.

Organic Farm in Shanghai Has New Visitor’s Center Constructed From Freight Containers

With the recent popularity of container architecture, we are seeing some beautiful designs from recycled freight containers, the new hotel and office for Tony’s Farm in Shanghai, by design firm playze, features traditional Chinese typologies combined with a livable aesthetic to bring an stylistic elegance to what could otherwise be a cumbersome form.

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

Founded and owned by Tony Zhang, Tony’s Farm is Shanghai’s largest organic vegetable farm, providing natural, safe, organic produce to thousands of Shanghai residents each day. The farm is dedicated to soil improvement, water cycle system purification, and grows food without chemical fertilizers, hormones, or additives. No genetically-modified vegetables are permitted.

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

The new 11,400 square foot visitor center at Tony’s Farm, constructed of 78 shipping containers, will be used to welcome farm guests. Hotel rooms will be built in the second phase. It features a lobby and reception area, VIP area, courtyards, operational offices, and a store, with a connection to a packaging warehouse.

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

Sustainability was a primary goal in the construction and operation of the design. Heavy insulation has been used in container walls, some of which are perforated to allow for natural lighting, while retaining the exterior’s raw industrial appearance.

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

To visually and physically connect interior and exterior spaces, the building is designed as a continuous spatial sequence, inviting visitors to explore.

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

On the second level, two connecting bridges lead to the office wing, which is covered by an existing warehouse. Offices are sheltered beneath an existing room to form an inner facade towards a production hall.

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

Terraces transition between interior work and leisure spaces. From the cantilevered main entrance, visitors are greeted at the reception desk in a three-story high lobby adjacent to an inner courtyard.

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

Energy efficiency concerns were addressed with a geothermal heat pump for heating, cooling, and controlled ventilation. Additional green approaches include LED lighting and locally-produced bamboo flooring.

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

Container Architecture in Shanghai at Tony's Farm

All photos copyright Bartosz Kolonko

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Shipping Containers used in Multi Family Home Build
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Go here to see the original: Organic Farm in Shanghai Has New Visitor’s Center Constructed From Freight Containers

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Striking Modscape Prefab Point Leo Australia

Australian Modscape Prefab By The Sea at Point Leo

Australian Modscape Prefab By The Sea at Point Leo

Combining exceptional contemporary design with superior functionality, this two-
story modular prefabricated home is a striking addition to the seaside township of
Point Leo in Victoria, Australia.

Designed and constructed by Melbourne-based Modscape using seven modules, the
house comprises 1162.5 square feet of internal entertaining area, 624 square feet
of external entertaining space and 1205.6 square feet of accommodation, including
five bedrooms on the upper level. A feature of the house is a Corian kitchen bench
that continues out onto the exterior decking and incorporates a barbecue to create an
indoor/outdoor kitchen for year-round entertaining.

Externally, the house is clad in dark-stained Pacific teak plantation timber and rough
sawn Shadowclad, giving an affinity with its natural seaside environment.

All Modscape homes are based on sustainable design principles aimed at minimizing
environmental impact, maximizing year-round comfort and reducing running costs.
The upscale Point Leo house cost $AU681,000 with a build time of just 12 weeks.

The house is orientated to optimize passive heating and cooling and capture sea
breezes for natural ventilation. It incorporates high thermal insulation, double glazed
windows, a solar hot water service, 3+ star-rated water efficient fixtures and fittings,
rainwater collection for potable use, greywater recycling for toilets and irrigation and
drought-resistant landscaping.

Australian Modscape Prefab Kitchen Area

Australian Modscape Prefab Kitchen Area

All Modscape homes are constructed using fully welded steel frame modules
with structurally insulated panels. Modules can be arranged to create almost any
configuration of spaces and can be made to any size to suit the client’s site and
design. Homes are fabricated to completion prior to leaving the company’s Melbourne
factory, reducing site waste and environmental impact. All materials incorporated
are selected for sustainability, low embodied energy and minimal greenhouse gas
emissions.

Modscape are located at 430 Francis Street, Brooklyn, Victoria. For more information
visit Modscape

Australian Modscape Prefab

Australian Modscape Prefab Living Area

Modscape Bedroom

Modscape Bedroom

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Sunset Idea House Prefab in Healdsburg
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  3. Connect Homes to Reinvent Modular Prefab

Continue reading here: Striking Modscape Prefab Point Leo Australia

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The Year in Prefab [Dwell Magazine]

You’re probably interested in modern prefab if you’re reading this site.  So make sure to grab a copy of the December/January 2013 publication of Dwell.  Entitled “Prefab Comes Home,” the magazine includes about 60 pages of prefab coverage for the enthusiast. The cover features a “ready-made home” designed by Jens Risom in the late 1960s on Block Island, Rhode Island.  I enjoyed seeing the finished prototype by Simpatico Homes.

[+] Or grab a Dwell subscription through Amazon – $19.95.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

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The rest is here: The Year in Prefab [Dwell Magazine]

LivingHomes Intros Low-Cost CK Prefabs

Santa Monica-based LivingHomes just announced the launch of three new designs — the CK4, CK5, and CK7 — based on the affordable C6 (also featured here), which made headline news earlier this year.  CK Series designs are available for the price of $145 per square foot, not including installation or foundation, which is quite reasonable considering what’s available: a LEED Platinum level environmental program, high-quality modular build, and modern design inspired by Ray Kappe, FAIA.

All CK4, CK5, and CK7 homes will be built by Cavco and available in most states.  The build takes about two months, and the installation can be done in a day, according to materials from LivingHomes.

The prefab homes will achieve most of the company’s Z6 Environmental Goals of Zero Energy, Zero Water, Zero Emissions, Zero Carbon, Zero Waste, and Zero Ignorance with things like: energy-efficient lighting and appliances, low-flow water fixtures, floor-to-ceiling glass, clerestory windows, light tubes, transom windows, sliding glass doors, cork floors, a wood ceiling, formaldehyde-free millwork, wood siding, real-time energy feedback, etc.

CK Series homes are available in several floor plans.  Generally, they range in size from 1,300 to 2,200 square feet and carry a price that starts from $200,000 – $320,000, depending on the model.

The first CK home has been sold and will be installed next year on a property in Bell Canyon, California.  It’s a CK7 model with two stories, three bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, and about 2,200 square feet.

[+] More about the new, low-cost CK Series by LivingHomes.

Credits: LivingHomes.

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Go here to see the original: LivingHomes Intros Low-Cost CK Prefabs

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Four Insights from a Passive House Retreat

This is the Passive House Retreat in New England built by Aedi Construction with architecture and Passive House consulting by Boston-based ZeroEnergy Design.  I was able to trade emails with ZED, including Stephanie Horowitz AIA CPHC and Jordan Goldman CPHC, about the energy performance of the home over the last year, and they said actual performance exceeded all predictions — including Energy Star and PHPP usage calculations.  The home averaged 412 kW per month for all energy consumption.

That means the home can be net zero energy on an annual basis with the installation of a reasonably-sized 4.1 kW solar electric system, according to ZED.  And if you’re interested in the detail, all the geeky performance data is listed here.  Meanwhile, I want to share some takeaways or insights from the project team at ZED pertaining to the retreat.

First, it’s important to focus on the envelope first.  ZED treated the envelope as the primary “heating system” with special attention to orientation, insulation, windows, and air sealing.  Horowitz said: “You may have heard this before, but just in case you haven’t, prioritizing the building envelope first, then mechanical systems, and finally renewable energy systems is optimal.” That way you decrease the size of systems and, in turn, the renewable energy needed to power those systems.

Second, indoor comfort is under-appreciated. Most people are accustomed to drafty or cold housing, but an ultra-efficient home like the Passive House Retreat has even temperatures throughout. “Once you try it, you won’t go back,” said Horowitz.

Third, Passive Houses can be beautiful. Early architecture yielded to experimentation or overall testing of the requirements for airtightness or energy use. Now, windows and products and software are better, and Passive Houses can have both “exceptional performance and aesthetics,” according to ZeroEnergy Design, just like this retreat.

Fourth, values other than financial payback drive energy choices. When building a home, not every decision is driven by financial payback. Homeowners have many influences — including aesthetic preference, product availability, cultural background, personal values, etc.  When choosing paints, for example, financial payback may take a backseat to color, odor, quality, brand, or impact on air quality, or something else.

The same can be said for energy choices. An ultra-efficient home can be an expression of a non-financial value such as the desire to avoid using fossil fuels, consume less overall energy, or emit less CO2, according to Horowitz and Goldman. Similarly, the decision to use renewable energy could be driven not by payback but by a desire to advance the use of renewable energy.

Passive House Retreat obtained LEED Gold certification and the systems include a Mitsubishi ducted air-source heat pump (HSPF 10, SEER 15.5), Zehnder Comfoair HRV, and a GE GeoSpring heat pump water heater.  The build includes a double-stud wall assembly with spray foam and cellulose achieving R44 walls, a R50 slab, and a R60 roof.

[+] More about the Passive House Retreat from ZeroEnergy Design.

Update 10/25/12 – this has been updated to correct the source of certain quotes.

Credits: Greg Premru Photography (#1, 3-4); ZeroEnergy Design (#2).

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See the original post: Four Insights from a Passive House Retreat

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Efficient Modular Duplex in Yellowknife

You may recall a practical green prefab by SMPLy Mod that we featured about a year ago.  This duplex is by the same design firm, SMPL Design Studio (Joel Tanner), with new partners 9 Dot Engineering and Mod Home Developments.  The team employed modular construction to finish the duplex at 133 Moyle, and the homes perform quite well for being so far north: they require 55% less energy for heating and power.

The 1,300 square-foot homes, each with three bedrooms and two-and-a-half bathrooms, received an EnerGuide rating of 82, according to Joel Tanner at SMPL Design Studio.

This was accomplished with super efficient wall and roof assemblies (2