Shipping Containers used in Multi Family Home Build

Shipping Container Home

Shipping Containers will be used in a luxury multifamily home build; the site of construction is located in Detroit and will start in early 2013. Recycling 93 Shipping containers, this project is thought to be the first in the US and the hope is to easily replicate the build.

Three Squared Inc (environmental consulting firm)  is the company behind the Rosa Parks condo project and it was designed by local architect Steven Flum. The containers will be converted and stacked to make a 4 story dwelling which will make 20 separate liveable units, each with ducted reverse cycle air and tankless water heating. The actual construction time per unit and cost efficiencies make this project attractive, though the total costs will be a test as to the feasibility of future multifamily container home projects.

This is an interesting project, as it will offer a significant price reduction on singular dwelling container home projects. We will follow this closely and keep you updated on the progress when more information is released.

Natural Gas Myth, Container Condos, Thanksgiving Conservation, + Boosting Solar

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Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Solar Shipping Container House in Colorado
  2. Modular Container Home Built in Boulder
  3. Flynn’s Container House in TRON: Legacy

View original post here: Natural Gas Myth, Container Condos, Thanksgiving Conservation, + Boosting Solar

Six Oaks Container House in California

This 1,200 square-foot home was built with six used shipping containers in Felton, California.  Designed by Modulus, the home was the subject of a 2012 Citation Award from the Santa Clara Valley chapter of the AIA.  The architect camped on the site to study light and other characteristics, according to Dwell, and designed the layout to reduce construction grading.  The containers were left exposed but painted, and the walls were covered with drywall for a clean interior look.  Inside, an atrium was used for light and to radiate heat throughout the home.

[+] More about the Six Oaks container house by Modulus.

Credits: Modulus; noticed at Dwell.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Solar Shipping Container House in Colorado
  2. Bright Cargo Container Casa in Chile
  3. First Container House in Mojave Desert

Read more: Six Oaks Container House in California

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Modular Container Home Built in Boulder

There’s a container house in Nederland, Colorado, and soon there will be one in Boulder, too. It’s believed to be the first such project in Boulder, and showcases a design by M. Gerwing Architects for couple Mark Gelband and Courtney Loveman, according to a recent article on the Boulder Daily Camera. The design of the eco-friendly home was driven by the solar shade ordinance, a neighbor that wouldn’t help with the variance, and a challenging narrow building site (more detail here).

Located at 505 College Avenue, the 2,800 square foot home will have extensive windows, a cantilevered second-story master bedroom, and a solar array that stretches about 140 feet. The hope is to get close to net-zero energy on an annual basis.

The architect and owners met what sounds like a storm of opposition to the design, if you read the comments and quotes in this article on the Boulder Daily Camera. Colorado, as far as I’ve seen, is quite progressive, but this is a million-dollar neighborhood, so it’s kind of funny. Hello! There’s a new world of residential living that includes high-quality prefab, container homes, or modern architecture. I can’t wait to see this courageous home when complete. It’s coming together nicely.

[+] More about the Gelband Loveman Container House from the architect.

Credits: M. Gerwing Architects.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Solar Shipping Container House in Colorado
  2. Eco-Pak is a New Home in a Container
  3. Container Home Office Built for Relocation

See the original post here: Modular Container Home Built in Boulder

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Connect Homes Innovates in Silicon Valley

Connect:Homes is a Los Angeles-based manufacturer of prefab homes founded by Jared Levy and Gordon Stott (formerly with Marmol Radziner) on a mission to reduce the delivery costs associated with modular construction and make sustainable homes more affordable. To make that happen, Levy and Stott spent the last three years designing, prototyping, and patenting a system to cost-effectively deliver prefab homes, and they put their awesome prototype on display at Dwell on Design 2012.

In summary, a large part of the solution is to size the modules to be transported by the intermodal shipping container network. All Connect:Homes, therefore, can be delivered virtually anywhere in the world by truck, rail, or ship.

But to be clear, these aren’t container homes, these are homes shipped on a framework designed for intermodal shipping containers.

Transportation can cost nearly $100,000 cross-country or $400,000 overseas for the typical prefab home, according to Connect:Homes, so designers and builders have been forced to use regional factories that may or may not offer a high-performance build or a desirable selection of finishes or materials.

Not satisfied with the high costs or other limitations, Levy said, “We asked ourselves if you can ship a shipping container full of 64,000 lbs of goods around the world for $5,000, why should it cost you so much to ship a house?Connect:Homes ships 90% completed modules and cuts delivery costs by up to 90% to deliver a more affordable home.

Shipping innovation isn’t the only advance that Connect:Homes aims to bring to factory-built housing. To avoid the cost of renting a 240-ton crane, which Levy said could be up to $15,000 per day, the company will use giant castors to roll modules into place. This is something that only applies to the ground-level modules, but like a skateboard, the home just rolls onto a finished foundation.

The company will test this installation method when sending the Connect:2.1 prototype to the Hillview Community Center, 97 Hillview Avenue, Los Altos, California, for the Dwell Silicon Valley Home Tour starting on November 3, 2012. Visit this page for more detail.

In terms of pricing, Connect:Homes start at $140 per square foot out of the factory and range to $165 per square foot delivered and installed, according to a company statement.

Connect:Homes come with house-wide LED lighting, floor-to-ceiling windows and doors, 100% recycled content glass countertops, in-wall dual-flush Duravit toilets, an insulation package to match any climate (standard of R21 walls, R30 floors, and R45 roof), and other materials that can contribute toward credits for LEED certification.

[+] More about Connect:Homes modular prefab from California.

Credits: Connect:Homes (#1-2); Bethany Nauert, West Elm (#3-4).

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Connect Homes to Reinvent Modular Prefab
  2. Cozy Connect:2 Prefab Wows California
  3. Blu Homes Prefab Unfolded in Joshua Tree

See more here: Connect Homes Innovates in Silicon Valley

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July Month in Review [+Thoughts]

It’s been another month, and I’m happy to have you as a reader.  I want to be honest for a second … I hope you don’t mind.  Sometime in the last month, Jetson Green celebrated about five years in publication.  Can you believe that?!  I’m just in awe of what I’ve learned and seen and covered.  There’s so much going on in just our tiny niche of “green homes.”

I should let you know that I personally never saw myself becoming a publisher when I started this site.  I started Jetson Green as an outlet for something that I’m passionate about — green homes, modern prefab, alternative energy, etc.  Increasingly, to give these topics the kind of attention worth reading, I find myself spending more time with research and less time with publishing.  I find myself reading more and writing less.  And I’m thinking more and saying less.

Some of this comes from a deep desire to avoid wasting your time.  That’s the last thing I want to do.

But some of this introspection, if you will, may come from being somewhat of a new dad with young boys.  Maybe it comes from an evolving attitude towards life in general.  Or maybe it comes from a nagging thought inside my head: “Who on earth practices law during the day, blogs at night and on the weekend, stays active in the local community, and sleeps give or take five hours a night every night for five years?“  Talk about the most unsustainable work-life balance ever.

That said, I have to say, I’m having a blast and wouldn’t change a thing so far.

What’s happening, however, is I’m seriously evaluating my trajectory for the next year.  For full disclosure, I’ve been approached a few times about selling this site, and those talks haven’t materialized because I am the site.  I get the feeling potential buyers want some sort of passive income stream or something — robots pumping out widgets for a steady line of income.  So, to make this a serious business, I need to focus on building a team, creating processes, and becoming the most dominant publisher ever.  And maybe that’s where things go.  Or maybe not.  I’m thinking about these things and will probably make some changes that you’ll notice over time.  I’ll keep you posted, that’s for sure.  But I just want to let you know that the next year should be different.  If things aren’t different, I think I’ll have failed you as a reader and myself in my own personal goals.

If you have any thoughts, please feel free to email me at preston at jetsongreen dot com. Again, I’m thankful to have you as a reader.  Keeping sending us your news and tips.

Meanwhile, here’s an outline of coverage from July.  The most shared new coverage from the month centered around shipping container projects: the bright Liray House and a faux container hotel in China.

Innovative Prefab & Other Projects:

Technology & Products Innovation:

Know-How & Other Green News:

Also, subscribe to our weekly newsletter for updates, article summaries, newsworthy links, and other site news.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Modern Home Contained in Missouri
  2. Container House Fit for Valentine’s Day
  3. Eco-Pak is a New Home in a Container

Read more: July Month in Review [+Thoughts]

Snoozebox is a Portable Container Hotel

Snoozebox is poised to take advantage of an alignment of circumstances with the Olympics in London.  The company provides temporary lodging in the form of portable, stackable, scalable hotel rooms made with shipping containers.  Snoozebox is currently providing about 320 rooms for security personnel at Hainault Forest Country Park from July 14 – August 15, 2012, according to The Financial Times.  The portable hotel can be ready within 48 hours of arriving at almost any event or location in the world, and rooms have internet, TV, a personal safe, attached bathrooms, etc.

[+] More about portable temporary hotels from Snoozebox.

Credits: Snoozebox. 

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Five-Star Luxe Container Hotel in China
  2. Lookotels Green Prefab Hotel Startup
  3. Tiny Tubular Hotel Built in Three Months

Link: Snoozebox is a Portable Container Hotel

Eco-Pak is a New Home in a Container

James Green is an aircraft structural engineer who found a creative solution when designing a home for a remote site in Turkey (that wouldn’t allow a concrete foundation).  Green decided to structure the house around a shipping container with an extended skeleton of removable frames.  Seeing more potential, he then patented the idea and teamed up with architect Matthew Coates of Coates Design Architects in order to deploy “Eco-Pak” as modular and sustainable housing.

Eco-Pak is an interesting twist on the standard shipping container home in that the structural parts of the home are packed and shipped in a container.  The container is then integrated as a module in the structure of the home, such as for the kitchen, living room, or bedroom.

We are doing something ENTIRELY different … it’s one thing to renovate the inside of a shipping box but quite another to create an eco-friendly home that uses the box as structure,” according to a statement by Coates, an architect at the firm that designed the green-roofed Ellis Residence.

Coates and Green plan to adapt Eco-Pak to affordable, off-grid, emergency, and maybe even luxury housing.  A prototype is scheduled for completion in 2013, and I’ll keep tabs on the new modular venture to provide updates as they happen.

[+] More about the Eco-Pak at Building Container.

Credits: Coates Design Architects.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Cargo Container Home Office from $1800
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Read more: Eco-Pak is a New Home in a Container

April Month in Review [Outline]

Below is a general outline of our coverage from April. In terms of our new articles, two articles lit up on Facebook: this one about the TINY movie trailer and another about a solar-powered container house.  Also, as always, we’re interested in learning about inventive green homes and new green products around the USA. If you have news for JetsonGreen.com, send us a tip.

Innovative Prefab and Home Projects:

Technology & Products Innovation:

Know-How & Other Green News:

Also, subscribe to our weekly newsletter for updates, article summaries, newsworthy links, and other site news.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

  1. Modern Home Contained in Missouri
  2. Solar Shipping Container House in Colorado
  3. Work Begins on New LEED Platinum Prefab

Here is the original post: April Month in Review [Outline]

Container Home Office Built for Relocation

This is a three-level studio and living space by daiken-met architects in Gifu, Japan.  Called Sugoroku Office, the space is made with seven used shipping containers and a structural steel frame that holds the intermodal units together.  The project sits on a basic parking lot under short-term lease so design for deconstruction and relocation was a critical driver for the end result.  Sugoroku Office has about 1,200 square feet, several work stations, a kitchen, and a loft that’s ready for living.

[+] More about this container-built Sugoroku Office in Gifu, Japan.

Credits: Shinkenchiku-sha; noticed at Design Boom.

Related Articles on JetsonGreen.com:

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  3. Tetra Shed is a Creative Tiny Home Office

Excerpt from: Container Home Office Built for Relocation

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